Couple Money

How to Buy a House (and Still Have Money for Other Goals!)

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Buying a house soon? Find out how you can find an affordable house that you love!

Buying a House – Run the Numbers!

Owning a home is a dream of some people, but there are many that either feel like it’s impossible for them to achieve it.

I will say up front that I don’t think home ownership is for everyone.

If you’re not willing to put in the legwork and run the numbers, it can be a huge financial and emotional burden.

Taking the time to get a financial plan in order can be a huge step in helping you reach your goal.

It can also provide you a way to make home ownership a relatively enjoyable experience.

Keep Your Total Housing Costs 25% (Or Less)

When we first were married we had a desire to own a house at some point in the future. 

At the time , we knew that we weren’t financially or emotionally ready for the big responsibility.

We focused on handling that first before we even gave serious thoughts to house hunting.

The biggest financial preparation was getting into the mindset of living off of one income.

Even though we’ve been a two income couple, we felt that living simpler and below our means would help us reach some of goals quicker.

At the time, they included:

It would’ve been impossible if we tried to do it all while having our day to day budget be based on both incomes.

I was an intern at the time, so it made sense to us to base the family budget on my husband’s pay. We’ve done our best to keep to this system.

When we were looking at a house to buy, we again made the choice to focus on only one income.

We  also focused on keeping the numbers based on net pay, not gross income.

While we could’ve looked at more houses in “our price range”, we decided to stay within our  limits.

It gave measure of comfort, knowing we were having a bit off buffer with our finances.

Another reason for us to be conservative was our goal to have a reasonable interest rate with our mortgage.

We knew that in addition to the down payment we’ll put down, the lenders were looking at a couple of other numbers to determine the interest rate they offered.

Debt to Income Ratio

Having a high amount of debt can ruin your chances of getting a loan. Lenders want to know that you can make these payments for years down the line and your debt to income ratio is one thing they analyze.

Your debt to income ratio is calculated by simply taking all your debt (student loans, credit cards, car loans, etc) and dividing that amount by your income.

You want to make sure your ratio is lower rather than higher. If your debt to income ratio is higher than 36%, you could have a hard time qualifying for a mortgage.

Loan to Value Ratio

Another reason to take your time and build a down payment is the loan to value ratio and how it affects your chances of getting a mortgage.

The loan-to-value (LTV) ratio is basically the mortgage loan amount you’re hoping to get divided by the appraised value of the property you’re considering to buy.

Don’t Forget Your Other Goals!

This is important becuase lenders and real estate agents don’t figure this into their calculations.

Your lifestyle will be affected significantly unless you plan accordingly.

What If You Really Want to Buy a House?

Buying a house can be a great financial and personal goal to have if you prepare ahead of time.

You have basically have some options to look at carefully before you make a final decision.

Thoughts on Buying a House You Can Afford

How did you figure out how much mortgage you could afford? Did you rely on the estimate from the lenders or did you run the numbers yourself?

Did you receive any pressure from your real estate agent to get a more expensive house? If so, how did you cope with it?

If you’re a homeowner, what kind of mortgage did you get and why?

This post was originally released in March 2016. The show notes have been updated in March 2019.

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